CO Bishops Letter on the Hyde Amendment

A Letter on the Hyde Amendment and other pro-life Congressional policies

We, the Catholic bishops of Colorado, urge Congressional Representatives to support the Hyde Amendment and the Walden Amendment. We also ask the Faithful to sign The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) petition to lawmakers encouraging them to preserve the Hyde Amendment, which can be accessed at: www.NoTaxpayerAbortion.com, and to contact their Congressmen and women to support the Hyde and Walden amendments.

The House Appropriations Labor and Health and Human Services subcommittee recently passed a spending bill that strips protections for pre-born children, healthcare providers,and American taxpayers by excluding pro-life provisions, including the Hyde and Weldon amendments.

The Hyde Amendment, which prohibits taxpayer dollars from being used to fund abortion in most cases, except for rape and incest, has received bipartisan support since its inception in 1976 – including by pro-abortion administrations. Hyde is critical in saving lives. The Charlotte Lozier Institute estimates that approximately 60,000 pre-born babies are saved every year because of the Hyde Amendment.[1] This is the first time in 40 years that the Hyde Amendment was not included in the annual appropriations bill[2] and failure to include pro-life amendments will only further increase divisions in our country.

The Weldon Amendment prevents any federal programs, agencies, and state and local governments from discriminating against health care practitioners and institutions that do not provide abortion services. It ensures that pro-life individuals and organizations can enter the health care profession without fearing that the government will force them to perform a procedure that violates their well-founded convictions. It has also received bipartisan support and was added to the appropriations bill every year since it was first enacted in 2005. [3]

Congress’ recent actions endanger the lives of pre-born children and infringe on the rights of millions of Americans who do not wish to participate in the moral evil of abortion. A recent Knights of Columbus/Marist poll found that 58 percent of Americans oppose taxpayer funding of abortions[4] and a 2019 Gallup poll shows that 60 percent of Americans think abortion should either be illegal or only legal in a few circumstances.[5]

The government should neither use taxpayer funds for the killing of pre-born children nor compel medical practitioners and institutions to violate their well-founded convictions. Congress must uphold these long-standing, common-sense bipartisan policies that promote a culture of life in our nation.

Human reason and science affirm that human life begins at conception. The Church objects to abortion on the moral principle that each and every human life has inherent dignity, and thus must be treated with respect due to every human person. There has never been and never will be a legitimate need to abort a baby in the womb.

It is critical that Congress continue its long-history of supporting policies such as the Hyde and Walden amendments, and that all Colorado Catholics and people of good will make their voice heard in supporting these life-affirming policies.

Sign the petition to Congress here: www.NoTaxpayerAbortion.com

Contact your Congressional Representatives here: https://cocatholicconference.org/news/

Sincerely yours in Christ,

Most Reverend Samuel J. Aquila
Archbishop of Denver

Most Reverend Stephen J. Berg
Bishop of Pueblo

Most Reverend James R. Golka
Bishop of Colorado Springs

Most Reverend Jorge Rodriguez
Auxiliary Bishop of Denver[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_button button_color=”color-wayh” size=”btn-lg” wide=”yes” border_width=”0″ link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fcocatholicconference.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2021%2F07%2F21-07-22-Hyde-Amendment-Bishops-Statement-FINAL.pdf|target:_blank”]Hyde Amendment Bishops Statement[/vc_button][vc_button button_color=”color-wayh” size=”btn-lg” wide=”yes” border_width=”0″ link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fcocatholicconference.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2021%2F07%2F21-7-22-Hyde-Amendment-Bishops-Statement-SPANISH.pdf|target:_blank”]Hyde Amendment Bishops Statement – Spanish[/vc_button][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator][vc_column_text][1] New, M. J. (2016). Hyde at 40: Analyzing the Impact of the Hyde Amendment. The Charlotte Lozier Institute: On Point.

[2] Weixel, N. (2021, July 12). HHS spending bill advances without Hyde Amendment. The Hill. https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/562564-hhs-spending-bill-advances-without-hyde-amendment.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Knights of Columbus. (2021, January 27). Points of Unity on Abortion: Poll Shows Bipartisan Majorities Support Abortion Restrictions. http://www.kofc.org/en/resources/news-room/polls/american-abortion-opinions-remain-consistent.pdf.

[5] Majority in U.S. Still Want Abortion Legal, With Limits. (2019, June 25). https://news.gallup.com/poll/259061/majority-abortion-legal-limits.aspx.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Shana Black

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • The question involves several issues, and cannot be answered with a simple yes or no.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • I believe victims should be protected first and foremost. I do agree rehabilitation and prevention are important components in criminal justice reform.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • I believe in private investment and competition in the energy sector. Government policy should not be picking winners and losers.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Although I detest the ease of accessibility of such smut — I do not believe censorship of any kind of content despite appropriateness  should be an actionable policy of any government. I believe an action such as this should be better-handled in the free market/private sector.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am pro-life. I believe in the sanctity of life at all stages. I believe in a person’s freedom to exercise their sincerely held religious beliefs, privately, publicly, and in their businesses. I believe in smaller government and lower taxes, which means as a law maker, I would be less likely to redistribute people’s earnings to support anti-Catholic causes.

Damon Davis

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • While I personally disagree with the RHEA, the act is consistent with what the majority of Coloradans have voted for on citizen initiatives.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I support this in case Obergefell is overturned. Same-sex marriage has been embedded in society with divorces, inheritances, lawsuits, common law marriages all based on same-sex marriage, and it would be incredibly difficult to undo that, and incredibly unfair to say no same-sex marriage after this date.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Only the federal government can create a path to citizenship or right to work, but Colorado can and should protect the rights of immigrants who do find work, regardless of they are documented or not.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Only the federal government can create a path to citizenship or right to work, but Colorado can and should protect the rights of immigrants who do find work, regardless of they are documented or not.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • I believe this is a First Amendment issue.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am the candidate who is standing up for ordinary working people. I am fighting for affordable housing and more affordable higher education so that working families have a better chance to find prosperity. I want to protect the rights of all workers, including immigrants. I believe in alternate sentencing and prison education in order to give criminals a second chance at life, while also reducing crime. I want to take reasonable steps to protect the environment, which is important to our Colorado way of life, but also to our tourism and agriculture economy. But I also believe, the Earth is a gift to us from God and should be treated with respect. And I believe the words of Matthew 25:40 do not just apply to personal decision, but also to decision made in the capacity of a public official.

Jeff Ravage

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • I believe it is the right of the pregnant person, in consultation with their health provider, to make any decisions about carrying to term or ending their pregnancy. You may be trivializing the agony of some of these decisions by pointing out only that this Act allows for elective abortion for every week of pregnancy. No one flippantly has an abortion late in their pregnancy unless there is some horrible circumstance: Life threatening to mother, child or both. Life is both joy and pain and you cannot relieve another of either of them by forcing your beliefs upon them.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I have no opinion one way or the other. I think that more providers may come to Colorado if only because of the new rules of some surrounding states.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • I have no opinion one way or the other. I think that more providers may come to Colorado if only because of the new rules of some surrounding states.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • It should be patient, and science centered. If a physician finds themselves in a practice where best treatments offends their “deeply held beliefs” perhaps they should find a new profession.  I was raised Roman Catholic and believe that Jesus would agree “ Never let your perceived beliefs keep you from extending compassion on your charges” It is not ours to judge.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • The erosion of education by both government and  private interest is showing itself to be the greatest danger that America, and democracy have yet faced. Enough of this shifting public education funds to private schools who may not have their charges best interests in mind. Or to religious schools that may teach actual fallacy (yes, evolution is real) placing their graduates at a disadvantage when released into a world of reality.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Right now, the environment is our greatest challenge. Our abuse of the world that gives us life has led to a situation where human life may become untenable in only a few decades if we don’t change our ways. If the above words are used honestly, with full intent to find environmentally friendly solutions, then that is the main issue of my candidacy. But if it is a veiled green-wash intended to allow subsides of fossil fuels in the: “Encouragement of private investment and competition within our energy sector” as has happened over and over again- then no I won’t let profit motive and business as usual to exterminate the human race. I will fight against that with my last breath.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Since the biggest porno free-for-all is the internet. I would go farther and suggest we ratchet down access to much internet content for children under 18. I believe studies will show that social media may be worse for a child’s wellbeing and self-esteem than graphic pornography. And that’s saying something. So perhaps there could be strict limits on internet use for those who brains should be developing with one to one personal contact, fresh air and playgrounds. 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I will fight for your rights equally with everyone else. I do believe in the first amendment and the freedom of religion. But that must include the freedom from religion.  When I was raised Roman Catholic, I was taught that Catholics follow their tenets, but never force them on others. Jesus said this, and never mentioned abortions or homosexuality. We should strive to lead with compassion and help those who we  find need it most. I believe in science and find no conflict between it and religion. Science is the best tool we have found to discover facts, and religion, at its best, is the tool that helps us use that knowledge with integrity and justice for all.

Jacob Luria

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • I am not comfortable with current abortion laws in Colorado. No the government should not be incentivizing abortion.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I do not think governenment should be involved in marriage. But since they are I would support this.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • No that would be a massive violation of the first amendment. 
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I think private charity is more effective than government welfare.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am the most liberty orientated candidate on the ballot. I will always stand up for your religious freedom. 

Jack Daus

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I support legal immigration
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • I decline to answer based on the misinformation about environmental issues
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I will make voting decisions generally based on conservative values that will promote opportunities for underprivileged and average middle class people to create better lives for themselves and society.

Heidi Pitchforth

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • All life is precious.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • The COlorado legislature should never attempt to restrict that which the U.S. constitution grants.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • We will always have the poor and needy among us and as believers, we must care for them. Ultimately, we should provide them with the skills and resources they need to be contributing members of society.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Colorado should help the poor and the needy, but all immigrants should obey the laws of the land.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Colorado should help the poor and the needy, but all immigrants should obey the laws of the land.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • It’s the how to restrict access that is the kicker.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

As an adopted child, I know and understand the gift of life I was given. I will support educational choice and parental voice in schools. Consequences for criminal behavior, with treatment programs for those in need will be a priority. I am a mom/nana who gets things done. I will be accessible and at monthly House District meetings. I will be done in two years as this is not a career choice; it is a civic duty I feel called to.

Greg Lauer

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • I am a very pro-life libertarian, which means I do not support government involvement in issues of life. By removing all government involvement, I believe that we who believe in the God-given sanctity of human life will be better able to do our best to naturally reduce the number of abortions happening at any stage of pregnancy. The state of Colorado should not be involved in the abortion issue in any way. This means that state law should not include or provide incentives for abortion providers, either individual or within “women’s health care” organizations.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I believe the government has no legitimate right to define or to regulate marriage. I believe marriage is a God-given institution and as such, there should be NO government involvement. Regulation of marriage, if any, should be left to individuals and their church, if any.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • There should be NO restriction of ANY kind on persons thinking, speaking, working, or acting according to their well-founded, sincerely held religious beliefs. The First Amendment to the United States constitution was intended to protect these rights at the federal level and is affirmed in the Colorado constitution, which means the legislature MUST NOT enact any restrictions on these activities.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I believe that welfare policy should be rolled back to the way things worked before Johnson’s “Great Society” policies were enacted. Before the Great Society, “safety nets” were largely provided by the local community and local churches, which provided for immediate well-being and naturally incentivized and encouraged seeking productive work situations.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • I believe that welfare policy should be rolled back to the way things worked before Johnson’s “Great Society” policies were enacted. Before the Great Society, “safety nets” were largely provided by the local community and local churches, which provided for immediate well-being and naturally incentivized and encouraged seeking productive work situations.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I believe all people have the natural (i.e. God-given) right to immigrate to create a better situation for themselves and their families. To support this right, our immigration laws need serious reform to guarantee basic human needs are met, productive work at proper compensation is available to anyone willing to do the work, and a clear and simple pathway to citizenship.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I am a strong supporter of school choice in many forms and will work tirelessly to find and enable as many options as possible to support a family’s right to choose what they believe is the best education for their children.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Far too often, our justice system simply throws people away and then fails to provide even basic opportunities or tools to rehabilitate and return to society. At the very least, victimless crimes (e.g., owning one more cannabis plant than the law allows) should not be codified as crimes. But for real crimes, there should be a path to rehab/return, based on the seriousness of the crime.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • As a libertarian, I believe that ALL investment in our energy sector should be private investments, thoughtfully incentivized.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • While I am very concerned that pornography is too easily accessed, I also believe that if we allow the government to create legal or technical restrictions on pornography access, we will have given that same government the ability to restrict access to any content labeled “dangerous.” Instead, we should seek market-based solutions that incentivize ISP’s providing ways to restrict content on a customer-by-customer basis.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a liberty-minded Christian who believes there is far too much government intrusion into our lives and especially in regard to our faith lives. I will work to roll back laws and other government restrictions on people of faith, which I believe are unconstitutional but have gone unchallenged. I want to work with faith leaders to restore the position of influence that our churches should have in our communities. 

Gabe Evans

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • “Agree, but it must encourage work, it must have a time limit, and greater protections to prevent abuse should be implemented.”
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • “Meeting basic human needs, enabling work, and streamlining legal pathways to citizenship is important, while also recognizing and taking decisive action against the disastrous human cost of open border policies.”
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Porn and kids shouldn’t mic, but unfortunately they often do. The prevalence of digital media makes Colorado Revised Statute 18-7-502 difficult to enforce.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a Christian and family man. I believe in our conservative values, limited government, and parental rights.

Edwin (Dean) Ormiston 

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • It’s too far into the gestation period. No we should not make this process convenient 
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Marriage is between a man and a woman 
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • Freedom of speech 
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Train people to be productive 
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Patient centered 
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • People come to USA to have a good life 
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Some people are retrainable
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Where there is a will there is a way 
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I have most of the same values. Also I believe in religious freedom 

No comment provided

Dennis Hisey

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • I spoke against and voted against the most liberal abortion bill in the nation when it came before the Senate last session.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Our welfare system needs to be a hand up not a handout
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Our immigration system is broken. We need programs in place to allow legal movement of people across the border including guest worker programs
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • U12
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • We should never forget that real people are affected by these decisions and you don’t eliminate one option before having a reliable alternative in place
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

They will find my core beliefs closely align with their core beliefs

Dee Dee Vicino

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I do not believe the government should be involved in marriage at all. Marriage should be determined by the church.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • As long as it is temporary.  We should have strong incentives t believe charitable organizations are better suited to provide services than the government. encourage people to enter the workforce, 
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Only if they enter the country legally.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • As long as those who engage in criminal activity receive appropriate consequences for their illegal actions. We cannot and should not put the safety of law-abiding citizens at risk. Criminals should be held accountable for their actions, and prevention and rehabilitation should be part of the equation. 
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • This is a first amendment issue. However, pornography sites are notorious for human trafficking, pedophilia, etc. A focused effort on cracking down on trafficking (locating and prosecuting traffickers) and anyone involved in child pornography should be a priority in Colorado. We need to fund these efforts. 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

As a lay pastor, a mother of a blended family, a female small business owner, an educator, and a policy analyst, I bring a unique, individual perspective to the table, one that represents average middle-class citizens of Colorado. I believe that representation has been missing for a long time, and I’d like to bring it back.    We need measured legislators in office, people who will consider all sides of the issues and make policy decisions that take into account unintended consequences. That is lacking in Denver right now. Colorado has the highest inflation rate in the country, the 5th highest crime rate, and the second highest rate of drug-overdose deaths. These policy decisions are crushing our quality of life and literally killing our kids. I’ve written policy for the education industry and developing countries, and I understand the consequences of enacting BAD policy. We MUST do better.

Courtney Potter

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • This law goes much farther than most Coloradoans believe it should. No, we should not incentivize any medical treatments. 
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • No, all individuals should have their well-founded beliefs protected.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Yes, the safety net should help people get back on their feet.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Yes, legislation should be patient-centered and protect the rights of medical providers.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Yes, legislation should be patient-centered and protect the rights of medical providers.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Yes, this money belongs to the families and should be able to be spent by families to invest in the best education for their children.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Yes, both preventing crime and rehabilitating offenders should be goals of the criminal justice system.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Colorado energy policy should encourage private investment and competition but shouldn’t provide governemtn incentives.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Colorado energy policy should encourage private investment and competition but shouldn’t provide governemtn incentives.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

Those of us who lead our lives according to our faith, need to step into the realm of public policy to ensure our rights are protected. Some say faith should be kept out of the public square, but we know this Country was founded on principles for faithful people. When we aren’t engaged, we leave the law and policy making to others who don’t make the same faith-based decisions we would.    In Colorado we have seen government try to criminalize businesses owners for their deeply held religious beliefs, and close churches to try to protect community health. We have also seen attempts to force medical procedures against people’s religious beliefs. In most cases our courts have overturned these attempts, but this battle must end. I will fight to protect our religious liberties and ensure we are able to live our faith.

Jonathan Ambler

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I am unsure of the intent of this question. When non-government agencies provided for immediate needs of the poor, the poor were better cared for than they are now.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Pathways to citizenship should always be encouraged, however the state should not motivate immigration.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Educational choice should be available to meet the needs of the student.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Pornography should not be made available through public schools.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

Colorado Catholics should vote for Jonathan Ambler to protect their first amendment rights. Colorado established its hostility towards people of faith with the multiple lawsuits against the “Cake Baker”. This trend continues and has resulted in various citizens needing to take their cases to the US Supreme Court. This persecution of persons of faith needs to stop. Our tax dollars should never be used to threaten our religious rights.

Cory Parella

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Repeal and revision for reconsideration. I plan to pitch an artificial uterus: https://youtu.be/3bP64x6ivkI
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I was raised Catholic. I now claim born again Christianity. I believe civil union life insurance payouts should be enforced. This law could otherwise be edited many ways.  
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • Enforcing this would require regulating web-based social sharing publication sources like Facebook, Twitter, TikTok, etc. to observe truth-in-advertising and libel laws. 
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I use medicaid myself.  Until the insurance industry is compelled into a free market, our stalemate remains. Obamacare wasn’t enough.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Humana once sold me a policy with no doctors in it. 
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I Do believe all immigrants should select at Border entry which US State they will pay taxes in to work here legally – not necessarily where they will be working.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Since a massive override of the public school system is emerging, I’ll say Yes, As-Is.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • My Plan involves such. Expand and strengthen the Mercy seat, enforce and increase sentencing. Add 2 strikes to the 3 strikes felony rule.  
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Gas, electric, emerging energy sources side by side at a repower hub. 
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Religious evangelism would be limited by the same laws. Let people choose. If we restrict any content, we take steps into Nazism. 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

My dad went Home to Jesus Christ in 1991 – as a self-confessed Catholic. He knew Jesus as his lord and savior. years later, I switched to protestantism after abuses by my home-parish drove me to find another place to worship. Colorado Catholics can count on me to be their Voice in terms to fairness, accuracy and contextual awareness. I know my Bible and the Law and I know how to navigate one with the other.  As much as I believe in the Separation of Church and State to prevent religious dictatorships, my fellow Believers in the Resurrection should know that with me in the Seat of HD42, I am a man of God prays before, during and after every Session. John 18:21  And if that ruffles non-Believers, I don’t give a sh*t. :)

Carol Riggenbach

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

“I believe in good ol’ fashioned values that honor God and our families. Families need legislatures to stand up and defend their rights as parents. I believe that most Coloradans and Americans want this country to honor God. We have not been represented at the capital when it comes to our Christian values. I stand for my Father in Heaven and the mercy He has bestowed on our State. I honor Him in all that I do. He asked “Whom should I send?” I answered, “Send me.” I will wholeheartedly represent the people of House District 62 and respect them. I go to make a difference, not just be a voice, but make a difference. We need God fearing legislatures creating and defending legislation that upholds our values. God Bless you all for what you do to help. We are all standing up and fighting together.”

Brandi Bradley

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • I don’t agree with abortion ever 
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I believe there is a legal path to immigration
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a pro-life fiscal conservative that believes in life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. I will uphold the constitution.

Bill Patterson

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • Although some words are painful and frustrating, religious and personal freedom is only achieved when we allow all people to speak freely without intimidation and censorship. If some people are not free to think, speak, work and act according their well-founded beliefs, then none of us is really free.  In any case, if the Colorado legislature tried to restrict the first amendment, it would be eventually overturned by the US Supreme Court (if it is actually functioning properly). 
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Work is as much about personal dignity as it is about earning money.  Both go hand-in-hand.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • No medical mandates. 
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Legal immigrants only.  Not all immigrants.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I support as many ways as possible to allow parents to educate their children in the manner that they see fit.  Parents are endowed by God to raise their children.  It is the state’s role to support that and not take it over. 
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Criminals need to serve the sentences that they are given.  No $1 bails or other ‘get of jail’ free cards. 
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Green technology is far too underdeveloped to fulfil current demand and will crash the economy. 
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • For minors only. Restrictions for everyone would be against the First Amendment. Adult restrictions need to be done by the adult in prayer with God if they are tempted.  Personal adult responsibility needs to be exercised as well. 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a life long, imperfect Catholic who fully understands the traditional values of the Roman Catholic church.   We achieve religious freedom as Roman Catholics by fully respecting the US Constitution and associated documents (e.g Decl. of Independence, etc). Our Catholic values need to deeply inform our secular life and politics but we must respect all people in the society and apply the same rules to everyone equally.  “Equal protection under the law” means what it says. 

Andrew Gibson

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • This should be a private discussion between patient and Doctor, the Government has no business in this decision. Colorado Law should not be involved in this personal decision 
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Love who you love, beyond recognition the Government should not be involved in Marriage. 
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • Restrictions on Free speech even if we disagree is wrong.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Consenting Adults should be free to decide what they want to watch. 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I believe in Individual freedom. We do not need a Government involved in most of our lives. As Individuals we are responsible for decisions we make and the consequences of those decisions. Our state has forgotten this.

Alexander Mugatu

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • The Corado General Assembly significantly overreached with such a heinous and barbaric policy. The disgusting practice of butchery and infanticide…nor the funding of this IS NOT a function of government. I WILL ABSOLUTELY sponsor and vote to repeal this disgusting act. Again, this should not under ANY CIRCUMSTANCE be considered a function of government!
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • The Legislature: Absolutely Not — However, I believe that social issues need to be decided by the society or community(s) in which we live. A vote of the people should be required.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • Absolutely not and would be a severe violation of both the U.S. and State Constitutions.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • This is a tough question: Welfare bu definition is a “safety-net” that is consistently abused by both recipient(s) and politicians who use the corrupted systems to garner votes. I FULLY AGREE that work should be encouraged and would draft legislation requiring the searching and attaining of a full-time job. I would cap welfRe benefits (to the able-bodied) to a five year maximum within a 15 year period. Meaning should an able-bodied recipient max out the full 5 years, they must work or wait an additional 10 years to be eligible to recieve again. The “hand up” has been allowed to become the hand-out. This is no longer Acceptable practice.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • But only when said legislation pertains to affordable and transparent care between provider and patient. I believe that insurance coverage should be regulated toward fulfilling the obligations of their policyholders. I believe that all the gimmicky policies insurers issue should be heavily scrutinized by the state insurance commissioner to either allow or deny the sale of a policy offering. 
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Aside from public health and safety, “basic human needs” are not a function of government. An efficient pathway to citizenship is paramount. As State Senator, I will work with our congressional delegation to do just that for those waiting in the queue. I will also work with the delegation, our chambers of commerce, and agricultural agencies to urge the state department to increase the number of temporary guest worker visas during the farm and agricultural seasons.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I also believe that school choice is a fundamental parental right where education funding should follow the child regardless of system. Public, private, charter, parochial, etc. Funding is per pupil and should follow each pupil! Education reform and funding is on my target list to tackle in my first term when elected.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Agree, but NOT in the manner in which this radical state legislature went about doing it. SB19-143  mandated the early release of prisoners  through the parole process, SB 21-271 was the so-called misdemeanor reform act that essentially took the handcuffs off of the criminals and shackled law enforcement…this bill also placed the minimum bounty on colorado families by allowing for a victimization of $2000 before an arrest can be made. Garbage legislation like this MUST BE REPEALED! Prison reform is also required to effectively rehabilitate rathher than simply “warehouse” convicted inmates.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Absolutely! Free market enterprise is desperately needed to replace the “regulated monopoly” system Colorado currently uses to effectively pick “winners and losers.” The Public Utilities Commission must also heavily scrutinized by the legislative oversight committee’s of jurisdiction. The bureaucracy of the PUC is out of control. As Senator, I will ensure these unelected political bullies are held to account with the highest degree of transparency.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Although I detest the ease of accessibility of such smut — I do not believe censorship of any kind of content despite appropriateness  should be an actionable policy of any government. I believe an action such as this should be better-handled in the free market/private sector.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

As a born and raised Catholic myself, I believe that God will guide my every action and allow me the free will to efficiently serve the people of our great state, along with the strength to stand above the polarization of partisan politics. With the issues facing us today, the polarization of our politics — we have now gone far beyond the pettiness of partisanship. The 2 party system has given us the Colorado we have today; and families are scared! I believe our friends and neighbors are in a desparate search for guidance and leadership based in viable solution to legitimate problems and not the typical “political rhetoric” we’ve grown accustomed to. I too am now skeptical of both Democrats and Democrats pretending to be Republican/Conservative (as in our case here in Pueblo/SD3) WE ALL deserve to be represented, they can have their parties — our faith will guide me to be the voice for the rest of us! Many Blessings! In the end, my friends in faith are also blessed with the same free will that I have. Although I stand as a candidate, the aided Write-in vote for Alexander Mugatu will be a vote in aid of us all! This is why I ask for your faith and support as we endeavor  in our pursuit of the greatest Colorado yet…    Pray for Pueblo, Pray for Colorado — and may God continue his many blessings of our great nation! 🙏 🤲 🇺🇸 🇺🇸 🇺🇸

Most Reverend Stephen J. Berg

Bishop of the Diocese of Pueblo

Most Reverend Stephen Berg is a native of Miles City, Montana. He is the son of Connie and Jeanne Berg and the oldest of 10 children. He attended Catholic schools in Miles City, graduating from Sacred Heart High School in 1969. He earned a Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 1973 and a Master of Music from Eastern New Mexico University in Portales in 1975. Upon graduation, Bishop-designate Berg taught music at Tarrant County College in Fort Worth. Subsequently, he worked 14 years in the retail nursery industry as vice president or general manager for divisions of Sunbelt Nursery, Inc. in Fort Worth, Southern California, Phoenix and Atlanta.

Bishop-designate Berg entered Assumption Seminary in San Antonio in 1993 where he received a Master of Divinity degree from Oblate School of Theology in 1999. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1999 by his maternal uncle Bishop Joseph L. Charron, C.PP.S, S.T.D, now the Bishop Emeritus of Des Moines. After his ordination, Bishop-designate Berg served as parochial vicar of St. Michael Catholic Church in Bedford, Texas from 1999 to 2001. In 2001, he became parochial vicar of St. John the Apostle Catholic Church in North Richland Hills, Texas. From 2002 to 2008, he was pastor of four rural parishes: St. Mary in Henrietta, St. Jerome in Bowie, St. William in Montague and St. Joseph in Nocona. In 2008, Bishop Kevin Vann appointed him vicar general of the Diocese of Fort Worth and concurrently he served as pastor of St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church. In 2010, he became the Moderator of the Curia for the Diocese under Bishop Vann and also served as administrator of Holy Name of Jesus parish. Upon Bishop Vann’s installation as Bishop of Orange, then Monsignor Berg was elected diocesan administrator in December 2012 by the College of Consultors for the Diocese. Bishop Berg was ordained and installed as Bishop of Pueblo on February 27, 2014, by Denver Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila at a Mass in Pueblo.

Most Reverend James R. Golka

Bishop of the Diocese of Colorado Springs

Bishop Golka is the fourth of ten children born September 22, 1966, to Robert and Patricia Golka. He was born and raised in Grand Island, NE. He graduated from Grand Island Central Catholic High School in 1985. He graduated from Creighton University in 1989 with degrees in Philosophy and Theology. He then spent one year as a Jesuit lay missionary volunteer at Red Cloud Indian School on the Native American Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota.

After applying as a seminarian for his home diocese of Grand Island, Bishop Golka enjoyed seminary formation at the St. Paul Seminary, School of Divinity, of the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MN, where he received both a Masters of Divinity degree and a Masters of Arts degree in Sacramental Theology.

He was ordained a priest for the Diocese of Grand Island on June 3, 1994. He has served as a Parochial Vicar and Pastor in various parishes. He has served the diocese in various capacities including Director of Ongoing Formation of Clergy, Chair of the Personnel Board, member of the Diocesan Finance Council, the Presbyteral Council, and as a member of the Diocesan College of Consultors. At the time of his election, he was serving as Rector of the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Grand Island, NE. He was also serving as the Vicar General for the Diocese of Grand Island.

Bishop Golka says that he greatly enjoys the pastoral ministry which is provided in a parish setting. Working with people at all stages of life and allowing the gift of our Catholic faith to provide direction, support and new life is greatly rewarding. He also enjoys helping to provide ongoing formation events for the clergy of the diocese to care for the wellbeing of his brother priests.

Bishop Golka has worked with national consultants to better help parishes develop stewardship as a way of life. He has offered numerous retreats across the country preaching the blessings of ordering our lives in recognition that all we are and all we have is a gift from God. A guiding scripture passage is Psalm 116:12 which proclaims: “How can I repay the LORD for all the great good done for me?”

Bishop Golka was Ordained a Bishop in Colorado Springs on June 29, 2021. The Diocese of Colorado Springs has approximately 183,150 Catholics in 39 parishes and missions. The diocese has 82 priests, 85 Deacons and 15 men in seminary formation. The diocese and its parishes provide religious education and formation to more than 9,000 students. There is one private Catholic high school in the diocese that currently serves approximately 254 students, while an additional 1,325 students receive instruction through five parish-based elementary schools. In total, there are more than 5,414 Catholic youths under religious instruction in the Diocese of Colorado Springs.

Bishop Golka looks forward to continued growth and expansion in the diocese. With God’s grace and with the support of the faithful, the Diocese of Colorado Springs will know many more years of serving the mission of the Church in Colorado.

Most Reverend Bishop Jorge H. Rodríguez

Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Denver

Bishop Rodriguez was born March 22, 1955, in Merida, Mexico, located in the state of Yucatan. He is the son of Nery Maria Novelo and Ramon Rodriguez (deceased), and he has one brother and four sisters, who live in Merida. In Merida he attended a primary school run by the Maryknoll Sisters, and then secondary and preparatory schools run by the Marist Brothers. When he finished high school, he joined the Legionaries of Christ to study and become a priest. He was ordained Dec. 24, 1987.

He was awarded a Doctorate in Sacred Theology by the Gregorian in Rome in 1994. He also has a licentiate in philosophy from the same pontifical university, and a diploma in Mariology from the Marianum in Rome.

He was the dean of the Theology Department of the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum in Rome (1994-1997). He has taught theology at the Pontifical Lateran University, at the Pontifical Institute Regina Mundi and at the Institute for Religious Sciences at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.

In 1999, he was invited by then Archbishop Charles Chaput to teach in the newly launched St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver, and to serve as Associate Pastor of St. Therese Parish in Aurora.

In 2002, he returned to Rome to serve as Associate Pastor of Stella Maris Parish in the Diocese of Rome, but then returned to Denver in 2006 to be a professor at St. John Vianney.

From 2007-2014, Father Rodriguez served as vice-rector of St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver. He was incardinated as a priest of the Archdiocese of Denver in 2008.

Since 2014, he has served as pastor of Holy Cross Parish in Thornton, Colorado, and he continues to teach the seminarians as well as the permanent diaconate candidates.

Pope Francis appointed Father Rodriguez as an auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Denver on August 25, 2016 and was ordained on November 4, 2016 on the feast of St. Charles Borromeo, the patron saint of bishops. He is also currently the pastor at St. Joseph parish in Denver.

He speaks Spanish, English and Italian, and reads French, and is the author of various theological publications.

Most Reverend Samuel J. Aquila

Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Denver

Samuel J. Aquila was born on September 24, 1950, in Burbank, California.  He was ordained to the priesthood in Denver, Colorado, on June 5, 1976, and served in parish ministry for 11 years.  In 1987, he began graduate studies at San Anselmo University in Rome, earning a Licentiate in Sacramental Theology in 1990.

He served as Director for the Office of Liturgy and Master of Ceremonies in the Archdiocese of Denver from 1990 until 1995.  He served the archdiocese as Co-director for Continuing Education for Priests, as an advisor to the Bishop’s Committee on the Liturgy, and as Assistant Secretary for Catholic Education before being named Secretary for Catholic Education, a position he held from 1995 until 1999.

From 1999-2001, he served as the first Rector of St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver and Chief Executive Officer of Our Lady of the New Advent Theological Institute.  In 2000, he was named a Prelate of Honor by Pope John Paul II, receiving the honorary title of Monsignor.

He was appointed Coadjutor Bishop of Fargo on June 12, 2001, and his Episcopal Ordination Mass was celebrated at St. Mary’s Cathedral in Fargo on August 24, 2001.  On March 18, 2002, he became Bishop of Fargo, and from 2005 to 2006 he also acted as Apostolic Administrator for the Diocese of Sioux Falls. On July 18, 2012 he was installed as the Archbishop of Denver, returning to lead the Archdiocese where he had originally served as a priest for 25 years.

Archbishop Aquila serves on numerous boards and committees, including the Papal Foundation, the Bishops’ Advisory Council for the Institute for Priestly Formation and the Board of Trustees for the Augustine Institute.  He is a member of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, in which he has served as a member of various committees. Archbishop Aquila’s episcopal motto comes from the Blessed Virgin Mary’s instructions at Cana: “Do whatever he tells you (Jn 2:5).”

John Hjersman

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Termination of pregnancy is  a matter for the mother and her doctor.  The government should have no say. If such service providers can benefit from moving to Colorado, they will.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • All marriages are between individuals, whether or not sanctioned by a church.  The government should have no role in the matter.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • There is a reason that this amendment is first.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • ​​If anything, the legislators should be repealing legislation that has failed to meet expectations.  Economies are healthier without legislative interference.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • immigrants who are illegal may need help with human needs, but they should be deported and encouraged to follow legal channels to immigration.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • “Preventing” crime is a near impossibility.  Attempting to prevent crime usually involves violating people’s rights in some manner.  Rehabilitation of criminals should always be a goal.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • The determination of how environmentally friendly a solution actually is requires looking beyond the “surface.”
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Censorship and moral guidance is the job of churches, not governments.

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I will do my utmost to protect the individual rights of Coloradans in HD-16.  I am a proponent of small government and responsible, individual liberty.

Justin Brown

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Late term abortion is disgusting.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I would need to know more about this hypothetical bill to confidently answer the question. If the bill was written in a way that would solidify what exists now, I would agree. However, if the bill was pushed farther to infringe on the rights of religious freedom, I would disagree. Religious organizations have the right to decide who can/cannot get married, without the government involved.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I am ok with a safety net as long as it promotes return to the work force. I am all about hand ups, not handouts. 
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I would want to know more about this hypothetical bill before I agreed to it. I’d like to place emphasis on enabling work and encourage citizenship so that they are able to afford their own basic needs.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • With exceptions
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a good Christian family man and share the morals with Catholics. My Democrat competitor is the face of abortion in this state and arguably in this country. 

William Waters

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • The child in the womb is a human being created in the image of God.  Abortion is the premeditated murder of a child.  There is no proof of the non-humanity of the baby in the womb. Why should Colorado Law provide incentives to murder children? Pro-choice people have to deny all good common sense to reason that a child is not human in the womb.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • God created marriage between a man and woman. 
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    •  This idea is a direct attack to our freedom under the First Amendment.  If we allow this to become law, then all of our freedoms will be gone forever.  We would be living under tyrannical government.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • We must not empower the professional or generational or lifetime welfare recipient.   There should be a way out of welfare system that allows people to save up monies to improve their circumstances, to find housing, and to save for the major needs of life, not lock people into a system of dependency on government handouts. The welfare system punishes the very people it is to help by regulations that stops any self-improvement. I will work to make pathways off of welfare and to a prosperous life.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • We must put people first.  Patient or Provider, they are individuals’ who have value and propose in-and-of themselves.  Government must not use the health-care system to infringe on the rights or privacy of people.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • No. Under current law, Legal immigrants are required to show that they can support themselves before they enter the United States.  If the legislators put this into law, it would draw illegal immigrants and drain the resources for our schools and hospitals as it has already done in communities across the nation.  The State of Colorado does not have endless tax dollars.  Colorado legislators should uphold current immigration laws, not undermine them. There is a legal pathway to all who lawfully into this nation.  As a legislator I will work to improve immigration laws and I will support immigrants who come here legally. 
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I would support families in using their 529 savings to educate their children and their choice of which schools to attend.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • While this idea may sound good and noble, it ignores human nature of the heart.  This idea is already in practice across the nation, with very little success, recidivism rates are 80% or higher.  I was twenty-five years in the Denver Sheriff and this topic was the goal of many various community programs.  But rehabilitation is an individual heart issue, a person must want and seek diligently rehabilitation with their whole heart. As your legislator I will support incarcerated people who want real help in rehabilitating themselves, and I will support private organizations and charities who work with people that want to re-enter society.  But government programs have failed repeatedly in rehabilitation because the program is a one size fits all, and never looks at the spiritual issues a person is struggling  with. 
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • I will support legislation that promotes private investment and competition in the energy sector of Colorado.  I am for protecting our environment from the drilling site to the gas pumps, to our homes for lights, heat and air-conditioning and to the many businesses and manufactures in our State of Colorado with the lowest possible price. I oppose the polices of shutting down our energy sector for the pollical agenda of the radial environmental advocates who has created policies that in-turn created the so-called energy crises.  If the current administration would allow our oil and gas production, we would not have an energy crisis. The Idea of environmentally friendly policy is not the goal of these radicals. Their goal is to destroy the domestic energy industry. These radicals want control above all else. Destroying the energy industry helps them achieve such control.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Pornography harms everyone it touches, and it dehumanizes women and children.

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

My goals are to protect the innocence of our children. Radical members of our communities are looking to corrupt our most vulnerable. They seek to murder our children in the womb or corrupt them with sexual promiscuity. In the legislature I will fight to protect our children from the exploitation of radical sex and gender indoctrination. I will fight to empower parents, not teachers to make decisions on their children’s mental, physical, and spiritual well-being and hold those that circumvent a parent’s rights are punished to the full extent of the law. I will fight to ensure that schools are completely transparent with the parents of the students. Our state needs men of God to stand against the invasion of worldly evils praying on our children. I believe that God has called me to be one of these men. I hope to have your support on November 8th.

Rod Bockenfeld

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Providing incentives to abortion providers is basically using our tax dollars to subsidize abortions.  Taxpayers do not want to subsidize abortions.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Marriage is a religious ceremony between a man and a woman.  I am not opposed to civil contractual arrangements between same sex partners.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • As long as they are not causing physical harm or directly impacting others.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • May require educational and vocational training.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Medical providers should not be required to provide health care services that’s against their moral or religious values.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • If legal immigrant, yes.  If illegal immigrant, your basic needs should be met then you should be sent back to the country in which you came.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I have supported this legislation as a current legislator.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • As christians, it is our obligation to give folks a chance to reform.  Paying your debt back to society is the first step in establishing that one is truly reforming.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • The free enterprise system is our greatest attribute in this country.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Kids should be protected from pornography.

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a Roman Catholic who shares the values of the church’s teachings.  I attended a Catholic Grade School and High School and understand the value of a private sector education.

William B. DeOreo

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • This is a totally barbaric act. Colorado should outlaw abortions except where mother’s life is in serious danger.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Enshrining homosexual unions is totally wrong and might make it mandatory for Churches to all provide these services.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • We can not allow separation of church and state to emasculate the Church.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • But we can not foster a state or permanent dependency, and should favor assistance to whole families. 
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • We saw people denied critical health care during the “pandemic” who refused the experimental gene therapy.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I favor providing services to “legal” immigrants, and not accommodating illegals, except to return them to their homes.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I favor school choice in all its ramifications
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • This sounds amiguous.  Criminal justice should protect the innocent and punish the guilty.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • I will support making Colorado a leader in advanced nuclear power to provide a permanent solution to the energy problem, and allow fossil fuels to be used for better purposes than burning them to make power.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • I can’t believe that companies are allowed to sell these thing to our children.

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am an active member of the Catholic Church and I support the key social teachings of the church as embodied by the key encyclicals such as Humani Generis, Humanum Genus, and Pasendi Dominici Gegis.  One of my political guidelines is the principal of subsidiarity.  Viva Christo Rey.

Ty Winter

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Marriage is a covenant between two people and their deity or belief system, it’s not a function of nor the proper role of government to be involved in this process and should never have been.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I believe in a “Hand up” not a “Hand out”.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Become a citizen should be top priority and a plan to assimilate and thrive should be in place when coming to America, it is not the role of government to guarantee outcomes. 
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • ​​I am a proponent of school choice. Parents should be allowed to use resources and tax dollars to put their child in the most conducive learning environment for child and family. 
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • We need to back the blue, have truth in sentencing, and make criminals criminals again. 
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • We can look work towards incorporating alternatives but we must also continue to use oil, gas, and coal. We must strive for energy independence and bro g back the blue collar jobs that come with energy production. 
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • It is not the role of government to intervene. 

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I will be a staunch defender of religious freedom and also advocate for the value of LIFE. I will work hard for the constituents in HD 47 and will be a strong voice and advocate for the needs of the district l. 

Tim Walsh

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Any changes should be by the vote of the people.  I think everyone can agree that late term abortions should only be allowed if the life of the mother is in question.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Shouldn’t marriage be done at the local level and in churches if they are religious? Therefore I don’t think we need a state law.   
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • ​​These individual rights are protected by the 1st Amendment.  The role of government is to support and defend our individual rights, especially 1st Amendment rights.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • I believe that free enterprise is the best solution for developing innovations.  Incentives distorts the markets and picks winners and losers.  Private enterprise has always developed better solutions versus government meddling.  Affordable, clean, and abundant energy enables everything in modern life and has lifted billions out of poverty.  Transitioning rapidly to “clean” renewable energy will lead to scarcity, hardship and poverty. It will also hurt our most vulnerable population the most. 
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • As immoral as pornography is, it is not the proper role of government to restrict pornography.  Free people need a moral compass only derived from a foundation in a faith. God gave people free will to test their faith.  It would be difficult to create legislation against every sin.

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I deeply love our country and Colorado.  I have served my country in combat and have seen the evil that tyrannical and Godless governments have imposed on their people.  Our greatness comes from recognizing that God, not government or rulers,  gave us our rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.  Along with this and the self-evident understanding that we are all created equal has unleashed human potential.  I will be a servant leader who will bring principled and common-sense solutions to the State Capitol so that people and businesses can thrive and become the best version of themselves.  There are many challenges that I am ready to take on to improve public safety, tackle homelessness, mental health and alcohol/drug addiction (working with faith based org), and reduce the cost of housing, healthcare, and energy.

Stephanie Vigil

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • I believe RHEA was for the best, given that the Dobbs decision sent the decision on reproductive choice back to the states. Coloradans don’t believe in the government policing our bodies or bedrooms. There are in fact several types of healthcare providers for whom we are short-staffed in Colorado, to include psychiatrists and therapists, dentists and oral surgeons, and even primary care providers in rural parts of the state. If this also becomes the case for reproductive health providers, whether they prescribe/perform abortion services or not, I would be open to attracting providers the same as we would to fill any other need.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Yes, I believe in marriage equality. Love and devotion make a family.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • This is difficult to accurately answer without a little unpacking. I believe you’re asking if the government should restrict the freedom to worship and live according to one’s conscience, and no, I don’t believe it should. Actions by institutions get a little more complicated, depending on whether we’re talking about private, public, non-profit, or for-profit entities. “Think, speak, work, and act” also covers a wide range of possible experiences and activities. I would never advocate for anyone’s beliefs or personal expression to be infringed – religious, spiritual, or otherwise. At some point though, there are reasonable contraints on how we treat each other in a pluralist and diverse society, and when the issue arises, I cannot support using personal belief as a justification for cruel or discriminatory behavior towards others.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I believe wholeheartedly in harm reduction, housing first, and prioritizing caring support over punitive action. As far as encouraging work, I can’t imagine any facet of American society not doing just that. For good or for ill, the expectation to work is a pretty deep-seated value in our culture. Ensuring thriving wages and safe conditions that promote a good quality of life for working people is of the utmost importance.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Patient centered care is absolutely crucial. Healthcare is a basic and non-negotiable human need, and should be protected as a right. Protecting the conscience rights of medical providers is a bit more of a gray area to me. Certainly no one should be forced to perform procedures they’re opposed to, but neither should patients go into a medical situation expecting a certain type of care and finding out too late that they won’t be accommodated. There should always be options for patients to receive the care they believe is right for themselves, regardless of their insurance carrier or who’s in-network.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Definitely, and I’m proud to be endorsed by the Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition for my positions on immigration justice. We live on the ancestral homelands of the Ute, Arapahoe, and Cheyenne peoples, and have been populated over the years by migration both from all over this country, and from outside of it. This diversity is an asset and a blessing, and should not be suppressed by draconian immigration laws.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I’m inclined to say no, but I’m open to some kind of path to accommodate financing options for families who value a religious education for their own children. My primary concern is that accounts of this kind are tax-advantaged, and we already have a growing problem with public funds being diverted to religious education, and I greatly value protecting separation of church and state – to safeguard everyone’s religious freedom.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • A thousand times over, yes. The threat of punishment does not influence human behavior the way that our system claims it does. A more human-centered and evidence-based approach will serve us better, promoting both public safety and the protection of offenders’ and suspects’ right to due process. Law enforcement officers who abuse their power or mistreat ordinary citizens should be held accountable.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Definitely, and nearly every venue by which we can decarbonize and get to a regenerative energy economy, we should take. I would love to see residents and builders in El Paso County make more use of C-PACE now that our county has opted in, and I will ensure that our state leverages available federal funds to continue leading the nation on meeting climate goals.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • No. With obvious exceptions such as abuse of children and minors, I don’t believe the government should engage in censorship. It’s a personal choice whether or not to view sexually explicit material.

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I’d like to thank you for your thoughtful questions. While I am non-religious myself, I’ve found that I share significant overlap in humanist values with people of several faith traditions: welcoming the stranger, supporting the poor, and sharing resources equitably to make our society more just. Unfortunately there are some authoritarian figures among us who wield their religious convictions in a way that threatens the freedoms of others, and it is only when these threats arise that I find myself at odds with those of religious faith. I can confidently promise your members that I cherish your right to worship every bit as much as my own right to refrain, and that we will find plenty of worthy goals to work toward cooperatively.

Stephen Varela

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I believe marriage is an institution of the church, not the state. The state should recognize the ability of any 2 people to form a union.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I support DACA, but adults who come here illegally should not be able to jump in line ahead of those who follow the law.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Yes, but repeat dangerous offenders belong behind bars.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • I support an all-of-the-above energy policy. The state should not pick winners and losers.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

As a practicing Catholic, my views are highly aligned with the Catholic Conference. As a legislator, I will actively consult with and seek the advice of the Catholic Conference.

Shelli Shaw

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • This has two facets that are important to explain. I believe that any welfare program should be short-term and encourage work (not just “job hunting” but actually holding a job). However, the best welfare and support for the poor is the local community and churches. I do not believe it is the government’s responsibility to step in and use taxpayer money.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • All legal immigrants should be able to work with a pathway to citizenship; however, working means making money which then should provide for basic human needs. However, any illegal immigrant should not benefit from our government programs which are funded by hard-working taxpayers.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • I agree with preventing crime and trying to rehabilitate criminals; however, I believe the question becomes how and who pays for it. I believe in fiscal responsibility first since the money belongs to the American taxpayer.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • And Colorado should reduce regulations and excessive fees hindering the development of energy options including natural gas, wind, solar and other innovative ideas.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am the daughter of a Vietnam Veteran and a school teacher, the wife of a woodworker, the mother of three adult children, and the humble servant of God. I spent 18 years in education as an English teacher and district administrator. I believe in our children, their potential, and our future.   I am not a politician.  But I am a concerned citizen, and it’s time We the People take back our country and our freedoms. My name is Shelli Shaw, and I am running for Colorado House District 59.  I ask for your vote and support.

Scott Bottoms

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am strongly conservative and stand for life first and the restriction of government in almost every facet of life.

Ryan Armagost

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I am all for everyone’s equal rights to life, liberty, and happiness as long as it doesn’t affect the same for others.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I believe in immigration through the process of work and education, not illegal entry into our country and abuse of our liberties.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Educational choice and freedom
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • This sounds like government overreach and I am not for that, but there are and should be laws in place to keep certain unlawful pornographic material illegal to possess and distribute.

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a veteran of 22 years military and 10 years law enforcement.  I am about every American enjoying their Constitutional rights via freedom of speech, religion, and their overall pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness.  People and especially the government should not restrict that for anyone else, nor affect the lives of anyone from conception to their passing.  We need to bring values back to our country, and make character the only thing we judge of others.

Russ Carter

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • We should protect every child at any age. This is not the job of the government.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • It is not the role of the government to redefine marriage.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • The government should protect rights and liberties not suppress them.  
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • This can be best accomplished at the local level This is the job of the church, not government.  Reduce taxes so people will be able to support the church and non-profits.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • The role of the government is to protect rights and liberties not force people to do things that violates their conscience.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • This can be done at the local level like the churches and non-profits.  The is not the role of the government.  If the government would get out of the way of the church and business, people would be able to keep more money and not rely on the government.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Parent’s freedom to choose how and where to educate their children must continue to be protected.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Colorado spends over $13B on repairing or replacing damage from crimes.  Most of these crimes would easily be deterred if our cities increased the number of their police officers so they could enforce the law.
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Private individuals and business can provide solutions that are efficient and successful.  Allowing the private sector the opportunity to invest in our future energy solutions will advance technology and create wealth.  
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • This is not a free speech issue.  It is our job to protect children.

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am running to be your State Representative because the government has grown too big and reaches into every area of our lives and wallets.  Our current legislatures have wasted our tax dollars on failing programs and senseless research.   As your State Representative I’ll support legislation that focuses on smaller government and much less regulations.  As a business owner myself, I know that the heart of the business sector, SMALL business, knows how to solve problems, advances technology and creates wealth.   In addition, we need to protect all individual’s rights and freedoms, not just some people’s rights.

Rose Pugliese

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • However, same sex marriage is the law in Colorado.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Policy should be focused on a hand-up not a hand-out.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Government should not be in the middle of the doctor-patient relationship.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Immigrants should come legally to this country first.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • I support an all-of-the-above energy policy.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a devout Catholic and will follow the teachings of the Catholic Church in developing policy.

Rob Stutz

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • My person feeling aside, I do not believe it is the responsibility of a free government to impose any law in which its dominant guidance comes from ones personal religious teachings. Although OI believe it is the independent right of any pregnant woman to choose her path, I do not believe it is responsible for the government of all people to motivate actions one way or another. 
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • As much as I would like to leave the personal lives of individual citizens to themselves, it has become evident that many groups cannot refrain from forcing their sediments on other and there for a persons freedom to choose must be protected. 
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • I believe to truly respect the freedom of speech, one must respect the freedom of all speech. Even that speech which may make your blood boil.   
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Welfare should provide a net to catch someone and help them stand up, but should not be a life long income system that promotes stagnation. 
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • But in doing so, the medical providers should severe all ties and benefits form governmental programs that are paid into by all citizens. No one should benefit from the treating only certain people when their compensation comes from the taxes of all. 
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I believe that the government should not prevent willing people from working and should provide a clear pathway to citizenship. However, I do not believe it is the responsibility of the government to provide any mnore basic needs than we provide our own citizens. 
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • The funding systems for public education needs work. Less than 40% of the money gathered by taxes for education actually reach the children. The administrative mis-management would never be allowed in a true business environment so yes, parents should not have to spent taxed money to make up the difference.  
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Until greater attention is truly given to determining why people are committing crimes, then the focus of rehabilitation is moot. 
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • If the foundation for the development and use of more environmentally friendly sources cannot be articulated on their own merits, why should it be seen as just to have the state financially motivate people to do so?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • It is not the responsibility of the government to set moral boundaries. these are personal issues between private citizens. 

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I believe that I am a responsible choice to represent all of the constituents in my district, not just those of a particular faith. I believe it is my responsibility to listen to as many voters s reach out to me and follow that guidance. In the absence of such direction, I should support the individual rights. I imagine that many catholics may choose not to vote for me on the grounds that my primary moral guidance is the constitution rather than the Bible and I will support that choice. But if a catholic believes that ones religious positions should not be involved in ones political involvement, please consider me. 

Kathryn Anya Kirvan

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Only 6% of voters in the U.S agree with 3rd trimester abortions.  It is important to note that this law takes away the derivative rights as afforded by the Constitution of the United States. Additionally, a minor child does not need a consent from a parent or guardian to have the abortion. hts as afforded by the US Constitution.  Also, the law states that a minor child does not need the consent from the parents or guardians to have an abortion. This is truly sad if Colorado becomes an Abortion destination.  
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • I believe marriage is between a man and a woman.  This is sacred.  
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • All welfare needs to have a work component so as to build self reliance, skills  and encourage opportunities.  
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I believe immigrants need to come here legally.  
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • I think this is a great strategy to be used to break up the government school monopoly.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • All forms of energy need to be given opportunity to innovate and improve.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a wife, mother, Registered Nurse, friend and neighbor.  I love God with all my mind, heart and spirit.  He has given me many gifts in this life and I believe I have the skills, knowledge, and moral leadership that is necessary to bring people together for the common good. I think we have seen what happens when there exists no moral or religious conscience.  Colorado, is less safe, less affordable, and undereducated.  I will commit to restoring the parent’s bill of rights, make any possession of fentanyl, heroin, etc a felony, and repeal this extreme abortion bill. 

Rachel Stovall

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Yes in ideal circumstances that would happen. Colorado is less than idea so we may only be able to partially amend.  No. This is not an area that makes sense for government to be in. 
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • No. Same sex marriage, for better or worse, is already the law. 
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • Absolutely not. In a religious sense anyway.  Lawmaking generally sets limits in property and personal rights that is part of our social contract.  We should stick to that. 
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • When possible we should always encourage work. It brings dignity to the individual and enhances self esteem.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • I agree that healthcare legislation should be patient centered. Those rights have priority. Within this context protecting the conscience rights of the medical provider makes sense but communication and notice are key. 
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I am unsure of your definition of basic human needs. But Colorado law should certainly encourage and not block work. And legal pathways to citizenship are needed. I hope that agreement can be reached across the aisle on this. 
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Absolutely.  More and more families that intended to pay for the education of their children are being advised by young people that they do not have plans for college. 529 funds being available at all stages will help families to support their children at all educational stages. 
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • I’m confused.  I thought that this was happening now. I am deeply interested to hear the perspective of your organization. I am most interested in rehabilitation beyond the programming offered now. We must do something to solve the issue of recidivism. I spent 3 years on teen court and it an example of a program that helps with both of the goals stated here. 
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Of course.  I was under the impression that Colorado did both of those now.  So we should continue that.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Don’t we have laws that do that now? My impression of porn and child sex trafficking is that we have issues enforcing the law, not instituting it. I am certainly for protecting children and others at risk because of sexualized predators. 

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

Colorado Catholics should vote for me because I support their values both in theory and in practice.  I am a candidate who believes deeply in justice, mercy and sharing with those who are less fortunate. I will sponsor and join into lawmaking that helps us to move into policymaking that reflects the values of Coloradans who want our state to prosper and be in good health.

Paul Archer 

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • Supreme Court Preempted States on this issue.
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Markets should be allowed to work.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Pornography is satan’s weapon of mass destruction

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

As the only person of faith in my race, I will protect religious liberty. I will the faith community in addressing bug societal problems such as homelessness, substance abuse, and mental illness. I am prolife, my opponent is radically pro abortion

Melody Peotter

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I believe the law should encourage pathways to citizenships and legal work, but I believe it is the church and private entities that should support welfare
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Colorado’s energy policy should encourage private investment and competition and focus on sustainable solutions
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am pro-life, pro-family, and pro-freedom!

Marla Fernandez

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Yes. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/op-ed-legal-opinion- colorado-reproductive-health-
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
    • No. That’s the purview of the church. 
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • No. It violates our constitutional rights 
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • No.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • It should protect patients from egregious providers. 
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • No if they are illegal. Yes if naturalized or born here. If born here, they must not be subject to another jurisdiction. 
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Yes. It’s for a child’s education 
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Government should stay out of business 
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

They should vote for me Bc I will represent their individual interest and bring their voices to the floor. And I will uphold the constitution without reservations.     https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/libelous-claim-media-marlafernandezforhd3

Mario Valverde

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Question is too broad for me to be able to provide an answer. Big fan of encouragement of work aspect though
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Question is too broad for me to be able to provide an answer.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Question is too broad for me to be able to provide an answer.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Private k-12 education > current state of CO public school system
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Private k-12 education > current state of CO public school system
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • Green energy should still be in the research/innovation stage, not deployment stage. Unable to provide an answer due to the wording of the question.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

Look around you- is Colorado better or worse than it was 20 years ago? 10 years ago? 5 years ago? It’s time to stop doubling down on goofball policy. Time to stop voting based solely on the letter next to the candidate’s name 

Lynn Emrick

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • I advocate to support their journey to financial independence. 
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I support all legal immigrantion and pathways to citizenship. 
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I am a wife, a mom of 3, 100% pro life, and a devout christian guided by my faith. I want to protect the nuclear family and return to safety in our communities and schools.  I will stand for our most vulnerable population, our children, through transparent educational curiculums without agendas.  That is why I say: “People Over Politics” because no government agenda should run your family’s life. 

Le Sellers

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • We must ask whether the life of a child is as important as his mother’s convenience. Unless her pregnancy is a direct and imminent threat to her life, he should not be in any danger of losing his own.
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • With ever-increasing numbers of laws and regulations, are we more or less free today, free to express the thoughts that make us human beings, agents to act, rather than being things to be acted upon? The difference between animals and human beings, aside from our being God’s children, is that we can think and make conscious decisions. To hinder in any way one’s ability to express those opinions and choices is to deny our humanity.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • Why does government arrogate unto itself the power to take whatever it deems necessary from the people who create wealth to give it to others who do little to make others better off? The truly needy, those who face serious challenges, need our help, but using the power of the government to make this happen does not put the needy in a better position; few rise from poverty because of welfare. The vast majority of our safety net is and must be charity, not welfare. Both giver and recipient benefit from charity; only bureaucrats and politicians benefit from welfare. Charity ennobles the human spirit in myriad ways; welfare weakens and destroys mankind in each of those ways. Charity is better in all ways, and it works better, as well.
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • I worry about turning over control of health care to any government. Bureaucrats and politicians have no vested interest in health outcomes. Blindly applying a “rule book” to cases always results in health care failures. Patients and their health care providers should be free of any bureaucratic constraints when determining how to approach that patient’s care.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • I am greatly concerned about the dangers faced by illegal immigrants who travel the thousands of miles from their homes to come to an uncertain future in America. Immigration, per se, is a federal issue. Colorado has the responsibility to protect her citizens first, last, and always. Guests who enter by the door have a legitimate expectation of compassion, but those who break in though a window should be politely shown that door and told to follow the law and common courtesy by requesting permission to enter.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Educational freedom for the children’s benefit is their parents’ right, and parents, as the primary responsible parties for their children’s education, must have the ultimate control over when, where, how, what, and by whom those children are taught. Who controls the purse strings controls the outcome; 539 programs return that control to parents. In addition, however, parents must be equal partners in defining the curriculum used in the classroom.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • The working class and the poor cannot hope to prosper when energy is priced beyond their reach. Higher energy costs are the direct result of over-bearing regulation and taxation.  We all want a clean environment. We must work to use the resources God has given us in a way that will protect the earth, but the prosperity of God’s children is also a high concern. We are smart enough to do both, and with His help we can. The state must work towards a win-win-win solution that takes all sides into account.
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • We wonder who will be making the decisions about what is restricted. Adults can choose on their own. Children, by definition, are not able to make those choices without parents to help them weigh the costs. With carefully crafted legislation, we can protect our children while allowing for adults to make those choices for themselves. 

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I worry that our freedoms, especially those named in the federal Bill of Rights, including the freedom to practice our religion as we choose, freedom of speech, and freedom to peaceably assemble, are being eroded, and that parents are losing their fundamental responsibility to raise their children as they see fit. We are facing a horrendous assault on the Family — we face equally horrid attacks on individual responsibility and the right to maintain our blood-bought heritage of religious and other defining liberties. I firmly believe in and will fight to protect the rights of the people to determine their own futures as long as those choices do not interfere with the rights of others. I spent 22 years in the US Army dedicated to protecting those rights from foreign foes. I will not stand by while domestic opponents weaken and takes them from us.

Kyle Moore

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • This is not the business of the state, this is an individual choice
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • 1st Amendment

 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

In short, I don’t think it’s right for anyone to tell Catholics, or anyone for that matter, how they should live their individual lives. You are free individuals who have a right to practice without government intervention. God gifted us free will, and I choose to endorse that gift.

Ken DeGraaf

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
    • Abortion is a natural occurrence at the end of a non-viable pregnancy, while Feticide is the intentional ending of the life of a pre-born human. RHEA promotes and protects Feticide.  The purpose of government is to secure our Creator endowed Rights, among which are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. The Right to Life is premised on being created, not on a heartbeat or some conception of personhood, and can only be conferred from a higher power. Thus to claim Rights for myself, I can only accept them as conferred from God and must extend that status to others. I can only deny those Rights to others by denying their status as Creator endowed, which precariously denies them to myself as well.  The codification of RHEA effectively ends any Right to Life. Modern medicine was built on the Hippocratic oath, which has the first principle of “do no harm” directly links the dangers of both feticide and euthanasia–“Nor shall any man’s entreaty prevail upon me to administer poison to anyone; neither will I counsel any man to do so. Moreover, I will give no sort of medicine to any pregnant woman, with a view to destroy the child.” In conjunction with securing the Right to Life of the pre(& post)-born human, the government has an obligation to the mother in ensuring appropriate obligations are held against the father, and severe deterrent punishments against those committing rape or incest. No. Feticide is a violation of Human Rights, not something to pursue as a growth industry. 
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
    • No, nor should they restrict the same for ill-founded, or lightly-founded beliefs to the extent they do not infringe on the Rights of others’ “Life, Liberty or Pursuit of Happiness” for which the government is purposed with making secure. Ultimately speech is the foundation of thought, and free speech is the basis for addressing and solving problems, which by their very nature involve an offense of some sort. Civil discourse should be encouraged so that differences can be resolved in the marketplace of ideas, not through the coercion of State.
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
    • No. Unfortunately it has proven beyond the capacity for government to effectively and compassionately care for those needing a helping hand since Government programs are incentivized to create government dependence. Charity cannot be coerced, but that is the only means by which the government can obtain money to perpetuate a poor imitation of the Christian charity it intends to supplant. Per the Colorado Constitution Article V, section 34, “no appropriation shall be made for charitable, industrial, educational or benevolent purposes to any person, corporation or community not under the ABSOLUTE CONTROL OF THE STATE”. Thus, before asking the State for money, we should ask over what or whom we would like the State to have absolute control. This is a better role for charity, with taxes reduced accordingly, which will foster economic growth and create jobs.  
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
    • Yes. Forcing providers to act outside of their conscience will result in fewer medical providers, and those remaining providers being those willing to act without conscience. What is actually needed is to prevent legislation requiring the violation of conscience, instead of a specific governmental permission to adhere to it.
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Our Declaration of Independence recognizes that all of humanity is endowed with the Rights of Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness, but does not ensure anyone “has” or is provided anything, regardless of immigration status. Immigrants must be here legally, otherwise they are subject to trafficking and exploitation in the underground economies. Government can only ensure provision for “basic human needs” if those resources are first coerced from another, which is theft regardless of intentions. Medical care could be more effectively obtained if self-pay was allowed at Medicare rates which are typically 20-25% of billed amounts. Minimum wage laws serve to keep low-skilled workers out of the economy and drive up inflation.
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
    • Yes. Educational expenses should also be counted as tax credits through 85% of the per-pupil State expenditure. This would encourage the formation of alternate educational enterprises which could encourage revitalization of housing areas currently avoided due to inadequate schools, and reduce commuting distances to work.
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • Yes. The first way to reduce crime is to allow the growth of actual opportunities to succeed outside of criminal activity by reducing the government’s taxation chokehold on the economy to pay for frivolous and unconstitutional laws and spending. Opportunities for legal & productive work can only occur in areas where law is followed and crime is prevented. “Repaying a debt to society” cannot be just a matter of having been sequestered with other criminals if a functional return to society is expected. This is another area where minimum wage laws prevent those trying to return with the ability to access the first rung of the ladder to success. 
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
    • no, government incentives are simply political favors paid by taxpayers. “Environmentally friendly” must be extracted from “ideologically constrained.” The best way to lower the cost of energy is to stop preventing the extraction of natural gas and declassify CO2 as a pollutant, since it is literally the building block of plant growth. CO2 produced by human activity is only about 1% of that produced naturally, and the US contribution merely about 15% of that 1%.  While CO2 does respond to low-energy longwave infrared radiation, its effect on climate is minor to inconsequential compared to that of water (https://youtu.be/XIBsjBvRTew).  The foundational models for CO2 require an adjustment exceeding 15%, rendering them useless for predicting the variations of less than 1% that will supposedly send the climate careening into catastrophe. There are numerous cycles that reinforce and cancel to create variations in climate, chief among them is the sun which has increased in output since pre-industrial revolution by what equates to over seven times the global energy output, or the equivalent of 21,000 barrels of oil per second. Minor variations in cloud cover dwarf any effect of CO2. “Green energy” is not “green,” except in funneling cash primarily to China which, in accordance to the Paris Accords, burns as much dirty coal as it wants to produce our solar panels and windmills, which will likely never offset the power used in their production. In the meantime, these costly programs increase joblessness and homelessness. 
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • Yes. pornography is exploitive, damaging and addictive (enslaving); it is also associated with abuse, extortion and human trafficking, undermining the Rights of all participants. 

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I hold it to be self-evident that mankind is created in the image of God, and that my role in government will be to secure their Creator-endowed Rights with only those just powers derived from the consent of the governed who remain sovereign to the government itself.   I recognize that history has shown that governments who exceed the role of securing our Rights in the pursuit of some humanist utopia have always descended into tyranny.   I know that the best place for tax dollars is for them to remain in the hands of citizens, and that there is no problem the government cannot make worse with a solution.   We’ve created an insatiable beast in government, and the sooner we address that reality the better.  

Kathryn Lehr

  1. Life – Should the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which allows for elective abortion during all 40-weeks of pregnancy, be overturned? Should Colorado law provide incentives for abortion providers to move to Colorado to meet abortion demand from out-of-state pregnant women?
  2. Family – Should the Colorado legislature codify same-sex marriage in law?
  3. Religious Liberty – Should the Colorado legislature restrict the freedom of individuals and institutions to think, speak, work, and act according to their well-founded beliefs?
  4. Economic Justice – Should welfare policy provide a safety-net to improve the immediate well-being of the poor and encourage work?
  5. Health Care – Should health-care legislation be patient-centered and protect the conscience rights of medical providers?
  6. Immigration – Should Colorado law ensure all immigrants have basic human needs, enable work, and encourage pathways to citizenship?
    • Not all – we should have a say in who we want to become citizens
  7. Education – Should Colorado law allow families to utilize their own 529 savings account funds for their children’s K-12 education (this has been permitted by the IRS since 2018 but states must opt-in)?
  8. Restorative Justice – Should Colorado’s criminal justice reform focus on both preventing crime and offering those who commit the crime an opportunity to rehabilitate and effectively return to society?
    • criminal justice is already stretched – can’t add to it another task
  9. Energy & Environment – Should the Colorado’s energy policy encourage private investment and competition in our energy sector through incentives that are focused on environmentally friendly solutions to our energy crisis?
  10. Technology – Should the Colorado legislature pass policy that restricts pornography access?
    • This is a matter of moral choice – not the government

Why should Colorado Catholics vote for you to represent them in the state legislature?

I want to get drugs off the street and protect our kids and families. I want criminals to be in jail whether they are drug addicts or not. I want parents to direct their childrens’ education.